October Begins with Weather Whiplash in NYC

Autumn is a transitional season where a few warm days still pop up as cooler temperatures gradually take hold. This week in New York City, however, it felt like we jumped from mid-July to late October in only one day.

On Wednesday, the temperature soared to a sweltering 93°F, setting a new record high for the date. The previous record of 90°F had been in place since 1927. Then, the temperature plummeted overnight. On Thursday, the mercury only made to 63°F.  While not a record-breaker, it was the coolest day the city has seen in months.

The normal high for this time of year in the Big Apple is around 70°F.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Record Breaking October Heat in NYC

The season officially changed to autumn last week, but it felt more like summer in New York City on Wednesday.

The temperature in Central Park soared to 93°F, setting a new record high for the date. The previous record of 90°F had been in place since 1927. Wednesday also marked the second warmest October day ever recorded in the Big Apple. Only October 5, 1941, was warmer when the temperature hit an unseasonably sultry 94°F.

This type of heat is unusual for NYC in October. In fact, this was only the sixth time temperatures ventured into the 90s during the month since record-keeping began in 1869.

At this point in October, the normal high in the city is 69°F. But with a stubborn ridge of high pressure sitting over the region, warm air is flowing further north than it normally would at this time of year.  It is also important to note that as our climate changes, record warm days are occurring more often and the autumn season as a whole is heating up.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

September 2019: 8th Driest September on Record for NYC

September 2019 felt like a weather roller coaster in New York City. Highs ranged from a balmy 89°F to a chilly 67°F. But, with 18 out of 30 days posting above-average readings, the warmth won out in the end. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 70.4°F, which is 2.4°F above average.

In terms of precipitation, September was a month for the record books. The city only received 0.95 inches of rain in Central Park, marking its eighth driest September on record. It was also the second month in a row to deliver below-average rainfall in NYC. On average, the Big Apple gets 4.28 inches of rain for the month.

Climate Week NYC Focuses on “A Race We Can Win”

Climate Week NYC begins on Monday. This annual event is taking place alongside the UN Climate Action Summit, the theme of which is “A Race We Can Win. A Race We Must Win.”

Organized by The Climate Group, the week-long event brings together leaders from a variety of sectors, including government, business, and non-profit organizations, to discuss solutions to climate change. Their overall goal is to accelerate climate action and limit global warming to 1.5°C.

Public events to raise awareness and support of the summit’s mission are scheduled all around the city. They range in style from panel discussions and seminars to concerts and exhibitions. One early event taking place this Saturday is the “Our Future Festival”, which has been organized by the NYC Chapter of the Climate Reality Project.  For the full program of events, go to the Climate Week website.

Credit: The Climate Group

“Weather the Weather”: An Art Exhibition at the NY Hall of Science

Art and science have come together at the New York Hall of Science to highlight the fascinating world of weather. In a group exhibition titled Weather the Weather, artworks of various mediums explore the different ways we understand and experience the forces of nature.

Curated by Marnie Benney, this SciArt Initiative exhibition features the work of twenty-one artists from around the world. Honored to be one of them, images from my American Glaciers: Going, Going, Gone and Wildfires series are on display.

The exhibition will be on view from September 10, 2019 through January 10, 2020 at The New York Hall of Science, 47-01 111th Street, Queens, NY. For hours, directions, and a list of associated events visit www.nysci.org

Icebergs break off from Portage Glacier, AK. Credit: Melissa Fleming

NYC Weather Wrap-up: August 2019

August 2019 was another month of noticeable temperature swings in New York City. Highs ranged from an unseasonably cool 74°F to a balmy 90°F. In the end, however, the extremes balanced each other out. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 75.5°F, which is only 0.3°F above average.

In terms of precipitation, the city was unusually dry. Overall, eleven out thirty-one days posted measurable rainfall that added up to only 3.70 inches for the month. Of those eleven days, two produced strong storms that delivered more than an inch of rain each. This was the first time since March that the city received below-average rainfall. New York City, on average, gets 4.44 inches for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

July 2019: Tenth Hottest July on Record for NYC

July is usually the warmest month on the calendar for New York City, but this year it was especially hot. In fact, it tied July 1949 as the city’s tenth warmest July on record.

In all, it produced 26 days with above-average readings, including ten days in the 90s. Four of those days came during a heatwave in the middle of the month when the air temperature reached 95°F and the humidity made it feel well above 100°F.

Overnight lows were also mostly warmer than normal throughout the month. On July 20, the mercury only fell to 82°F, setting a new record warm low temperature for the date. In the end, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 79.6°F, which is 3.1°F above average.

It is important to note that four of the city’s ten warmest Julys on record have now occurred since 2010. The warmest was July 1999, when the average temperature for the month was 81.4°F.

This July was also above average in terms of precipitation. With several intense thunderstorms rolling through the area, a total of 5.77 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. The city, on average, gets 4.60 inches of rain for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

First Heatwave of 2019 Brings Extreme Temperatures to NYC

A heatwave gripped a large swath of the eastern United States this weekend. For many areas, the temperatures were extreme.

The threshold for what constitutes a heatwave varies by region, but here in the northeast, it is defined as three consecutive days with temperatures reaching 90°F or higher. In New York City, the official temperature in Central Park reached 91°F on Friday, and 95°F on both Saturday and Sunday. Overnight lows were also well above average. In fact, on Saturday, the temperature only cooled down to 82°F, tying the record warm low termperature for the date that was set in 2015.

When the humidity was factored in, it felt even hotter. The heat index ranged from 105°F-110°F.

The city’s airports, LGA and JFK, both in the borough of Queens, posted record high temperatures over the weekend, according to the National Weather Service. JFK hit 99°F on Saturday, breaking the previous record of 96°F that was set in 2013. On Sunday, LGA reached the century mark (100°F), tying the high-temperature record for the date at the site that was set in 1991.

The cause of this exceptional heat was two-fold. First, a large area of high pressure sitting over the central US was pumping hot air from the southwest toward the northeast. At the same time, a strong Bermuda High off the east coast was pumping warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico into the region. Together, they made it dangerously hot, which is why the NWS issued an excessive heat warning for the city. It is also why several outdoor events around the Big Apple were canceled, including the NYC Triathlon.

The hottest day ever recorded in New York City occurred on July 9, 1936, when the air temperature hit 106°F in the shade. The city’s normal high temperature this time of year is 84°F.

June 2019: A Soggy Start to Summer in NYC

June 2019 was another month of wild temperature swings in New York City. Highs ranged from an unseasonably cool 65°F to a balmy 91°F. In the end, however, the cold and warmth balanced each other out. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 71.7°F, which is only 0.3°F above average.

In terms of precipitation, the city was unusually wet. Overall, 13 out 30 days posted measurable rainfall that added up to 5.46 inches for the month. While that is a soggy statistic, it was not the wettest June the city has seen. That dubious honor belongs to June 2003 when 10.26 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. The city, on average, gets 4.41 inches for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

First 90°F Day of the Year for NYC

The heat is on in New York City! The temperature in Central Park soared to 91°F on Saturday, marking the city’s first 90°F day of the year.

While readings in the 90s are not uncommon for the Big Apple during the summer months, they typically premiere earlier in the season. On average, the city usually sees its first 90°F day by the end of May.

According to NWS records, the city’s earliest first 90°F day was April 7, 2010, and its latest was July 26, 1877.

For the season as a whole, NYC typically gets an average of 15 days with temperatures reaching 90°F or higher. By month, that usually breaks down as May (1), June (3), July (6), August (4), and September (1). That said, every year is different. The most 90°F days the city experienced was 37 during the sweltering summer of 2010.

Credit: Melissa Fleming