NYC Monthly Summary: November 2016

November felt like a weather roller coaster in New York City this year. We had highs that ranged from a relatively balmy 72°F to a chilly 41°F. However, with 19 out of 30 days posting above average readings, the warmth won out in the end. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 49.8°F, which is 2.1°F above our long-term norm. This was the Big Apple’s 17th consecutive month with an above average temperature – its longest streak on record.

In terms of precipitation, November was unusually wet and marked the first month since July that NYC received above average rainfall.  In all, we received 5.41 inches of rain which is 1.39 inches above normal. The majority of this plentiful total fell during two separate heavy rain events. In fact, November 29th was the city’s wettest day of the year and set a new daily rainfall record with 2.20 inches measured in Central Park. Nonetheless, despite these soakers, NYC remains in a moderate to severe drought according the latest report (12/1) from the US Drought Monitor.

November 2016 was NYC's 17th consecutive month with above average temperatures. Credit: The Weather Gamut

November 2016 was NYC’s 17th consecutive month with an above average temperature. Credit: The Weather Gamut

Nov 2016 was first month since July that NYC received able average rainfall. Credit: The Weather Gamut

November was the first month since July that NYC received above average rainfall. Credit: The Weather Gamut

Rainstorm Brings NYC its Wettest Day of the Year

A rainy day in New York City is typically nothing to write home about, but Tuesday’s precipitation was extreme. Heavy downpours brought the city more than half a month’s worth of rain in a single day.

According to the NWS, 2.2 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. Not only is that a new daily record for the date, it was the wettest day the city has seen so far this year. On average, we normally get 4.02 inches of rain for the entire month of November.

Suffering through moderate to severe drought conditions for several months, this rainstorm was largely beneficial for the area even if did put a damper on the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony. That said, even more rain is needed to bust this drought completely. Year to date, the city’s rainfall deficit is 7.24”.

This type of heavy rain event, according to NOAA, is expected to become more common in the northeast as global temperatures rise and precipitation patterns change.

Weather and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is a long-standing holiday tradition in New York City.  For 90 years, it has marched rain or shine. Nevertheless, the weather has been a factor for the event several times over the years.

Famous for its giant character balloons, high winds are the main weather challenge for the parade. According to city guidelines, the multi-story balloons cannot fly if there are sustained winds in excess of 23 mph or gusts higher than 34 mph. These regulations were put in place following a 1997 incident where gusty winds sent the “Cat in the Hat” balloon careening into a light post, which caused debris to fall on spectators.

The only time the balloons were grounded for the entire parade was in 1971 when torrential rain swept across the city. In 1989, a snowstorm brought the Big Apple a white Thanksgiving with 4.7 inches of snow measured in Central Park. The parade marched on that year, but without the “Snoopy” and “Bugs Bunny” balloons as they were damaged by high winds earlier that morning.

This year, the wind is not expected to be a problem. Temperatures, however, are forecast to be a bit chilly – mostly in the mid-40s.  So, bundle up if you are planning to watch the parade in person.

Marching from West 77th Street to West 34th Street in Manhattan, the 90th Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is scheduled to begin at 9 AM on Thursday morning.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Paddington Bear Balloon floats down 6th Ave in Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.  Credit: Macy's

Paddington Bear Balloon floats down 6th Ave in Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Credit: Macy’s

NYC Election Day Weather

Weather does not subscribe to any political party, but it can play a major role on Election Day. Studies show that it strongly influences how many people head out to the polls, especially if poor conditions are forecast.

Here in New York City, the weather is picture perfect this year. With blue skies and temperatures in the 60s, voter turnout is expected to be high.

The exact date of Election Day varies every year, but it is always the Tuesday after the first Monday of November. Below are some interesting local weather facts about the big day.

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The exact date of Election Day varies every year, but it is always the Tuesday after the first Monday of November. Credit: The Weather Gamut.

NYC Monthly Summary: October 2016

October felt like a weather roller coaster in New York City this year. We had highs that ranged from a balmy 85°F to a chilly 51°F.   But, in the end, the warmth won out. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 58.8°F, which is 1.9°F above our long-term norm.

On the precipitation side of things, the city received near average rainfall for the first time in months. In all, we received 4.15 inches of rain in Central Park, which is only 0.25 inches below normal. Of this total, 1.41 inches fell during a single heavy rain event on October 27th – the city’s wettest day since last May. Despite this soaker, the Big Apple remains in a moderate to severe drought according to the latest report (released on 10/27) from the US Drought Monitor.

October was a temperature roller closer in NYC. Credit: The Weather Gamut

October was a temperature roller coaster in NYC. Credit: The Weather Gamut.

Rainfall was near average in NYC for the first time in months. Credit: The Weather Gamut

Rainfall was near average in NYC for the first time in months. Credit: The Weather Gamut

An Autumn Chill in NYC

New York City, along with much of the northeastern US, is suffering from weather whiplash this week.

Last Wednesday, the temperature in Central Park soared to 85°F, setting a new record high for the date. This Wednesday, the mercury only made it to 51°F. That is a difference of 34°F! Our normal high for this time of year is 60°F.

Overnight lows in the city have also seen a dramatic decline. Dropping to 38°F early this morning, it was the coldest reading the Big Apple has seen since last April.

After enjoying summer-like conditions just a few days ago, these brisk temperatures are a reminder, albeit a jarring one, that autumn is a transitional season and winter is not too far off.

Ushered in by a dip in the jet stream, these chilly conditions are not expected to last much longer. Temperatures are forecast to rebound to more seasonable levels by the weekend.

A case of weather whiplash for NYC. Credit: The Weather Gamut.

A case of “weather whiplash” for NYC. Credit: The Weather Gamut.

Autumn Heat in NYC

From shorts to sweater weather and back again, Indian summer is in full swing in New York City.

The temperature in Central Park soared to 81°F on both Monday and Tuesday this week. On Tuesday, it was just one degree shy of the daily record set back in 1928. We will get another shot at a record on Wednesday if the temperature climbs to 83°F. (The forecast high is 82°F.) Combining these unusually warm readings with dew points in the 60s, it has felt more like August than mid-October in the Big Apple. Our normal high for this time of year is 63°F.

This unseasonable warmth is the result of a dominant Bermuda High, a large area of high pressure situated over the southeastern part of the country. Spinning clockwise, it has been steering warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico toward the northeast.

As pleasant as these summer-like temperatures are, they will not last much longer. Conditions that are more seasonable are expected to return by the end of the week.

How a Bermuda High ushers in hot and humid air to the northeastern US. Credit: Jacksonsweather

How a Bermuda High ushers in hot and humid air to the northeastern US. Credit: Jacksonsweather

NYC Monthly Summary: September 2016

Summer had an extended stay in NYC this September. Overall, 21 out of 30 days posted above average temperatures. These included three days with readings in the 90s, which is two more than what we typically see in September. With overnight lows also running mostly above normal, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 71.8°F, which is 3.8°F above average. That creates a three-way tie with September 1983 and 1884 for NYC’s 8th warmest September on record.

On the precipitation side of things, September was unusually dry and marked the sixth month this year that NYC received below average rainfall. All told, the city received a mere 2.79 inches of rain in Central Park, which is 1.49 inches below normal. As a result, according to the latest report (9/27) from the US Drought Monitor, the city remains in a moderate drought.

September was unusually warm in NYC this year. Credit: The Weather Gamut

September was unusually warm in NYC this year. Credit: The Weather Gamut.

The Creative Climate Awards – An Art Exhibition on Climate Change

The Human Impacts Institute is bringing art and science together in an effort to expand public understanding of climate change. In a group exhibition called The Creative Climate Awards, artworks of various mediums explore the challenges of this pressing issue.

This annual event, according to organizers, “uses the arts and creativity to share knowledge, broaden the climate conversation, educate, and incite action.” The show features artists from around the world, including: Ellen Alt, Ed Ambrose, Carolina Arevalo, Vikram Arora, Julie Bahn, Danielle Baudrand, Anna Borie, Laura Brodie, Kenneth Burris, Yon Cho, Alejandra Corral de la Serna, Michael Fischerkeller, Melissa Fleming, Rachel Frank, Kathryn Frund, Shelley Haven, Martin Kalanda, Kaiser Kamal, Julian Lorber, Heather McMordie, Dominique Paul, Peim, Fariba Rahnavard, Clark Rendall, Alexandros Simopoulos, Britta Stephen, Shira Toren, Lars Vilhelmsen, Joyce Ellen Weinstein, and Ana Gabriela Ynestrillas.

The exhibit runs from September 27th to October 27th at the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO), 1 East 42nd Street, NYC. The opening reception is scheduled for Tuesday, September 27th from 6PM to 8PM. This event is free and open to the public.

For a full list of events during the course of the exhibition, please click here.

"Energy: 300 Million Years" from the Under Glass series by Melissa Fleming. Credit: Melissa Fleming

“Energy: 300 Million Years” from the Under Glass series by Melissa Fleming. Credit: Melissa Fleming

Panel Discussion: “Climate Change: Art, Design, and Activism”

As part of Climate Week NYC, the Climate Reality Leaders of New York are hosting a panel discussion, “Climate Change: Art, Design, and Activism”, on September 22nd, at Civic Hall.

Offering observations and opinions from their own unique perspectives, the panelists will discuss how art and design can inspire activism, awareness, and solutions to the realities of climate change. Tara DePorte, Founder and Executive Director of the Human Impacts Institute, will moderate the panel.

Panelists include:

This event, co-produced by Simone Rothman and Harriet Shugarman (Founder and Executive Director of Climate Mama)  is free and open to the public. Please note that seats are limited and registration is required. Doors open at 5PM. Program begins at 5:45PM.

Civic Hall
156 Fifth Ave, 2nd Floor
(Between 20th and 21st Streets)
New York, NY 10010