July 2019: Tenth Hottest July on Record for NYC

July is usually the warmest month on the calendar for New York City, but this year it was especially hot. In fact, it tied July 1949 as the city’s tenth warmest July on record.

In all, it produced 26 days with above-average readings, including ten days in the 90s. Four of those days came during a heatwave in the middle of the month when the air temperature reached 95°F and the humidity made it feel well above 100°F.

Overnight lows were also mostly warmer than normal throughout the month. On July 20, the mercury only fell to 82°F, setting a new record warm low temperature for the date. In the end, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 79.6°F, which is 3.1°F above average.

It is important to note that four of the city’s ten warmest Julys on record have now occurred since 2010. The warmest was July 1999, when the average temperature for the month was 81.4°F.

This July was also above average in terms of precipitation. With several intense thunderstorms rolling through the area, a total of 5.77 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. The city, on average, gets 4.60 inches of rain for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

First Heatwave of 2019 Brings Extreme Temperatures to NYC

A heatwave gripped a large swath of the eastern United States this weekend. For many areas, the temperatures were extreme.

The threshold for what constitutes a heatwave varies by region, but here in the northeast, it is defined as three consecutive days with temperatures reaching 90°F or higher. In New York City, the official temperature in Central Park reached 91°F on Friday, and 95°F on both Saturday and Sunday. Overnight lows were also well above average. In fact, on Saturday, the temperature only cooled down to 82°F, tying the record warm low termperature for the date that was set in 2015.

When the humidity was factored in, it felt even hotter. The heat index ranged from 105°F-110°F.

The city’s airports, LGA and JFK, both in the borough of Queens, posted record high temperatures over the weekend, according to the National Weather Service. JFK hit 99°F on Saturday, breaking the previous record of 96°F that was set in 2013. On Sunday, LGA reached the century mark (100°F), tying the high-temperature record for the date at the site that was set in 1991.

The cause of this exceptional heat was two-fold. First, a large area of high pressure sitting over the central US was pumping hot air from the southwest toward the northeast. At the same time, a strong Bermuda High off the east coast was pumping warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico into the region. Together, they made it dangerously hot, which is why the NWS issued an excessive heat warning for the city. It is also why several outdoor events around the Big Apple were canceled, including the NYC Triathlon.

The hottest day ever recorded in New York City occurred on July 9, 1936, when the air temperature hit 106°F in the shade. The city’s normal high temperature this time of year is 84°F.

June 2019: A Soggy Start to Summer in NYC

June 2019 was another month of wild temperature swings in New York City. Highs ranged from an unseasonably cool 65°F to a balmy 91°F. In the end, however, the cold and warmth balanced each other out. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 71.7°F, which is only 0.3°F above average.

In terms of precipitation, the city was unusually wet. Overall, 13 out 30 days posted measurable rainfall that added up to 5.46 inches for the month. While that is a soggy statistic, it was not the wettest June the city has seen. That dubious honor belongs to June 2003 when 10.26 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. The city, on average, gets 4.41 inches for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

First 90°F Day of the Year for NYC

The heat is on in New York City! The temperature in Central Park soared to 91°F on Saturday, marking the city’s first 90°F day of the year.

While readings in the 90s are not uncommon for the Big Apple during the summer months, they typically premiere earlier in the season. On average, the city usually sees its first 90°F day by the end of May.

According to NWS records, the city’s earliest first 90°F day was April 7, 2010, and its latest was July 26, 1877.

For the season as a whole, NYC typically gets an average of 15 days with temperatures reaching 90°F or higher. By month, that usually breaks down as May (1), June (3), July (6), August (4), and September (1). That said, every year is different. The most 90°F days the city experienced was 37 during the sweltering summer of 2010.

Credit: Melissa Fleming

May 2019: A Soggy Month for NYC

May was another month of wild temperature swings in New York City. Producing several cases of weather whiplash, highs ranged from a chilly 48°F to an unseasonably balmy 86°F. In the end, however, these extremes balanced each other out. The city’s mean temperature for the month was 62.2°F, which is only 0.2°F below average.

On the precipitation side of things, May was unusually wet. The month brought the city a relatively rare spring nor’easter and several impressive thunderstorms. One of which produced golf ball sized hail on Staten Island, one the city’s five boroughs. Overall, 19 out 31 days posted measureable rainfall that added up to 6.82 inches for the month. While that is a soggy statistic, it was not the wettest May the city has seen. That dubious honor belongs to May 1989 when 10.24 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. The city, on average, gets 4.19 inches for the month.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Strong Storm Pelts NYC Borough with Large Hail

A powerful thunderstorm moved through New York City on Tuesday night. Generating strong winds and heavy rain across area, it also brought hail to Staten Island, one of the city’s outer boroughs.

According to reports, hailstones measuring 1.8 inches in diameter came down in the Bull’s Head neighborhood. Roughly the size of golf balls, it was the largest hail reported in the city since 2011.

The storm was strong enough to warrant a tornado warning for the area, but luckily no twisters touched down in the five boroughs. Nonetheless, the large hail is a testament to the storm’s intensity. Simply put, the stronger the updraft of a storm, the longer hailstones remain suspended, allowing them to grow larger.

The largest hailstone ever recorded in the US was found in Vivian, South Dakota on June 23, 2010. It measured 7.9 inches in diameter and weighed 1.94 pounds.

Large hail fell from an intense thunderstorm over Staten Island, NYC on May 28, 2019. Image Credit: Staten Island Advance/ J Yates

A Springtime Case of Weather Whiplash in NYC

Spring is a transitional season where a few cold snaps and warm spells are not that uncommon. This week in New York City, however, it felt like we jumped from March to July in only seven days.

On Monday, May 13, the high topped out at a mere 48°F. This set a new record for the coldest high temperature for the date. The previous record of 49°F had been in place since 1914.

Then, on Monday, May 20, the mercury soared to 85°F.  While not a record breaker, it was the warmest day of the year in the city, to date.

The normal high for this time of year is in the low 70s.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Spring Nor’easter Brings Unseasonably Cold, Wet Weather to NYC

A late season nor’easter soaked the northeastern United States on Monday. Heavy rain triggered flood alerts and advisories from Virginia to Connecticut, and areas further north reported snow.

Here in New York City, 0.70 inches of rain fell in Central Park. This came on the heels of the 1.32 inches that fell the day before when a separate storm system moved through the area. To date this May, the city has received 3.70 inches of rain and it is only the middle of the month. May, on average, brings the city a total of 4.19 inches of rain.

The storm also ushered in unseasonably cool temperatures, making it feel more like March than May. The high in NYC only made it to 48°F on Monday, setting a new record for the coldest high temperature for the date. The old record of 49°F was set in 1914. The normal high for this time of year is 70°F.

This storm was the result of a deep dip in the jet stream that moved over the region, which, in turn, helped generate an area of low pressure off the coast. Producing gusty northeasterly winds, it was categorized as a nor’easter. While this type of storm is more common during the fall and winter months, they can develop any time of the year.

A late spring nor’easter soaked the northeastern US. Credit: weather.com

April 2019: Eighth Warmest April on Record for NYC

April 2019 was unusually warm in New York City. It produced 18 days with above average readings, including one day where the temperature reached a summer-like 80°F. Overnight lows were also mostly warmer than normal.  In fact, on April 14, the mercury only fell to 60°F, setting a new record warm low temperature for the date. In the end, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 55.5°F, which is 2.5°F above average. That means April 2019 is now tied with April 1985 as the city’s eighth warmest April on record. The city saw its warmest April in 2010, when the average temperature for the month was 57.9°F.

This April was also above average in terms of precipitation, with 18 out of 30 days producing measurable rainfall. In all, 4.55 inches of rain was measured in Central Park. Of that total, 1.03 inches fell on a single day. The city, on average, gets 4.50 inches of rain for the entire month.

April 2019 was NYC’s 8th warmest April on record. Credit: The Weather Gamut

Summer Preview Brings NYC First 80° Day of the Year

It felt more like June than April in New York City on Friday. The temperature in Central Park soared to 80°F, marking the city’s first 80-degree day of the year.

Topping out at 17°F above average, the day was unseasonably warm. However, it was not a record breaker. That honor belongs to April 19, 1976, when the mercury soared to 92°F. The low temperature was 58°F, which is also warmer than normal for the date.

This spring heat was the result of a ridge in the jet-stream that allowed warm southern air to move further north than it normally would at this time of year.  These balmy conditions did not last long, though. A heavy rainstorm moved through the region over night and brought temperatures back to more seasonable levels.

Summer does not officially begin until June 21.

Credit: The Weather Gamut