An Increasing Number of 90° Days in NYC

The summer of 2014, overall, was fairly mild in New York City. We only had 8 days reach 90°F or higher. On average, the city typically gets 15. That said, this was just one season. Looking at long-term trends, the number of 90°F days in the Big Apple has actually been increasing.

The graph below shows the number of 90-degree days recorded in Central Park by the National Weather Service every year from 1870 to 2013. While there has been variability over the years, the trend is clearly on the rise.

To date, the most 90°F days that NYC has ever had in one year was 39. That happened in both 1991 and 1993. On the opposite end of the spectrum, 1902 only had one day hit the 90° mark. Last summer, we made it to 90°F or higher 17 times.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

The number of 90-degree days recorded in Central Park by the NWS every year from 1870 to 2013.  Graph Credit: The Weather Gamut

September Brings NYC Warmest Day of the Year

The summer months of June, July, and August have come and gone, but Tuesday brought New York City its hottest day of the year (so far). The high temperature in Central Park soared to 92°F.

According to the NWS, it was our warmest day since September 11, 2013 when the high was 96°F. The normal high in NYC at this time of year is 80°F.

Highlighting the relatively mild conditions that dominated this summer, Tuesday was also only the seventh time this season that the temperature reached 90°F or higher. The city, on average, typically sees fifteen 90-degree days per year.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

NYC Monthly Summary: August 2014

Continuing this summer’s trend, August 2014 hovered around average in New York City. While sixteen out of thirty-one days posted below average temperatures, three days reached the 90°F mark.  All together, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 74.4°F. That is only 0.6°F below normal.

In terms of precipitation, the Big Apple was mostly dry this August. Despite a few thunderstorms and heavy downpours, the city only received 2.25 inches of rain in Central Park. That is 2.19 inches below normal.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

A Late Summer Warm Up in NYC

It’s the last week of August and it finally feels like summer in New York City. The high temperature in Central Park has been in the upper 80’s for the past few days and today it soared to 90°F. This is worth noting, because high heat has been something of a rarity in the Big Apple this summer.

This season to date, NYC has only had five days reach 90°F or higher. On average, we typically get fifteen. Looking back, every month this summer brought a noticeable dearth of extreme heat. June had zero days with temperatures at or above 90°F, July had three and August (so far) has only had two.

The most 90-degree days that the city has ever had in one year, according to NWS records, was thirty-nine. That happened in both 1991 and 1993. On the opposite end of the spectrum, 1902 only had one day hit the 90°F mark.  Last summer, we made it to 90°F or higher seventeen times.

NYC Monthly Summary: July 2014

July 2014 was fairly mild in New York City with a noticeable lack of extreme heat. On average, July typically brings the Big Apple six days with readings of 90°F or higher. This year, however, there were only three. That includes the first 90° day of the season. In the end, the city’s mean temperature for the month was 76.1°F. That is only 0.1°F above normal.

In terms of precipitation, July is usually NYC’s wettest month and this year it lived up to expectations. In fact, it was the city’s wettest July in five years. We received 5.59 inches of rain in Central Park, which is 0.99 inches above average. Most of this total came down in three significant events associated with heavy thunderstorms.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Weather History: NYC’s Hottest Day

On this date in 1936, the temperature in New York City soared to 106°F. It was the hottest day ever recorded in the Big Apple.

This triple digit heat was part of an extreme heat wave that impacted most of the mid-western and northeastern United States. It was an extension of the massive heat dome that built up over the Great Plains a few weeks earlier. Nationwide, this extreme heat caused approximately 5000 deaths, nearly 100 of which were in NYC.

During the 1930’s – the height of the Great Depression – air conditioning was not very common. Many New Yorkers sought relief at city beaches and parks. At night, some even slept outdoors.

More recently, it is interesting to note that between 2000 and 2009, NYC only had one 100°F day. In the last four years, however, we have had five days hit the century mark.

New Yorkers crowd  the beach at Coney Island during the heat wave of 1936.  Image Credit: NY Daily News

New Yorkers crowd the beach at Coney Island during the heat wave of 1936.                              Image Credit: NY Daily News

NYC’s First 90-Degree Day of the Year

Summer officially began last month, but the season’s heat is just now getting into full swing in New York City.

In Central Park today, the temperature soared to 91°F. That marks the city’s first 90° day of the year.   While readings in the 90s are not unusual for the Big Apple in July, they typically premiere earlier in the season. In fact, with records dating back to 1869 for Central Park, the NWS reports that only nineteen years have failed to produce a 90°F day before the end of June.

On average, according to the NWS, the city generally sees its first 90°F day by June 3rd. Its earliest was April 7, 2010 and its latest was July 26,1877. Last year, NYC’s first 90°F reading was on May 30th.

NYC Monthly Summary: June 2014

June was warm and fairly seasonable in New York City this year. We had a few hot and humid days where the mercury made it into the upper 80s, but not a single day made it to 90°F.  That marks only the second time in ten years that the city did not see a 90°F day in June. Nonetheless, the city’s average temperature for the month was 72.5°F. That is 1.5°F above normal.

Despite getting off to a soggy start, the Big Apple came up a bit short this June in terms of precipitation. Most of the 4.26 inches of rain measured in Central Park came down in three significant events early in the month.  In the end, though, we were  0.15 inches below normal.

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

Credit: The Weather Gamut

A Soggy Week in NYC

One word can sum up the weather in New York City this past week – soggy.  Over the last five days, we received 2.97 inches of rain, most of which fell as heavy downpours on two separate occasions.

On Monday, 1.6 inches was measured in Central Park. Then on Friday, after a few days of scattered showers, another 1.28 inches came down in a single twenty-four hour period. It is only mid-June and the city has already had 3.96 inches of rain. The Big Apple, on average, receives 4.41 inches for the entire month.

It is interesting to note that June is now the third month in a row that NYC experienced at least one significant heavy rain event.

NYC Monthly Summary: May 2014

May 2014 was fairly warm in New York City. High readings in the 80s on six separate days helped push the city’s average temperature for the month up to 64°F, which is 2°F above normal. Following what felt like an endless winter, May was the first time all year that NYC had an above average monthly temperature.

In terms of precipitation, the city received 4.37 inches of rain. Most of this fell during two significant rain events, 1.54 inches on May 16th and 0.91 inches on May 23rd. On average, the Big Apple normally gets 4.19 inches for the entire month.

Graph: The Weather Gamut

Graph: The Weather Gamut